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 Do-Dont

 

DO's & DONT's

The Town of Farmington has the benefit of two major rivers that flow through its borders: the Farmington River and the Pequabuck River.  These rivers provide a habitat for wildlife and provide many aesthetic and recreational opportunities includingStorm-San_Sewer Diagram canoeing, fishing and swimming to name a few.  These benefits however, are ours to enjoy as long as we are good stewards and protect the water quality of these rivers and all the smaller tributaries that ultimately flow into them (collectively called a watershed).  We all must do our part to prevent stormwater runoff from polluting our waters.  Under natural conditions, rainwater and snow melt runs overland, where it collects impurities before flowing into rivers or streams either directly overland, or inside a storm sewer system via catch basins.  The result is the discharge of untreated runoff into the same rivers we treasure for their aesthetic and recreational values.  We can all do our part minimizing the impurities that stormwater runoff comes in contact with. 

Many people may not be aware where storm water discharges.  Storm water runoff from roofs, lawn, driveways and other surfaces on your property, flow either directly or indirectly to streams, wetlands, or ponds through catch basins and a network of storm drainage pipes.  See what happens when you use a rubber duck to simulate stormwater pollution.

 

  

If Pollutants were a "Rubber Ducky"

 

HAZARDS OF IMPROPER HOUSEHOLD WASTE DISPOSAL

Improper household waste disposal leads to water pollution, land pollution, air pollution, loss of biodiversity and exposes residents to health risks.

Improper Hazardous WasteImproper Hazardous Waste

When improperly disposed, chemical wastes find their way into waterbodies through surface runoff and seepage into groundwater. These polluted waters are unsuitable for recreation, consumption as drinking water, agriculture or any other economic activity due to its adverse health effects.

Additionally, many of us have mercury containing products at home: thermometers, thermostats, fluorescent lights, CFLs, barometers, and electrical switches and relays. It is important that any device containing mercury be disposed of at the Household Hazardous Waste Collection Event.  Mercury is a heavy metal that can be toxic to humans and wildlife or cause serious neurological or reproductive disorders.

 

Improper Hazardous Waste-2

ALL STORM DRAINS LEAD TO A STREAM, POND OR RIVER.

NOTHING BUT RAIN DOWN THE DRAIN.

 

 

WHAT DO I DO WITH….?

What Do I Do With

We all have those items lying around the house that we aren’t sure how to dispose of…Can I recycle it?  Can it go in the trash?  Is there a special disposal process?

CT DEEP has a great website to help answer these questions:

https://www.ct.gov/deep/cwp/view.asp?a=2718&q=325496#Books

 Or simply type: ‘CT DEEP What do I do with’ into your search engine and the website will be the top option.  It provides helpful, up to date information on how to dispose of any household item.

Dispose of all items properly to avoid water, land and air contamination!

Thank you!